Always ethereal, always eclectic, I write as the mood strikes, when there intrigue reveals itself. Usually that means something controversial or adventure of some sort.

I've tried really hard to be unprovocative, but have as yet been unsuccessful.

Tuesday, 8 May 2007

It's a Small World, After All

Shortly after I realized I was going to be State-side longer than I'd originally thought, I contacted my good friend Katie back in Morocco, to ask if she could get in touch with Janette. Janette was one of two people who'd worked at my GWA (my old school) who was in the Seattle area. (And the other one, no way in anywhere that I'm going to contact her! Let the reader understand.) I met her for only five minutes, as she taught at the school before I got there, and knew her as someone dating a guy that I'd had the opportunity to meet a few times, teaching at a school back East of us in Casablanca. I didn't know her at all. But I thought it would be fun to get to interact with someone with some common GWA and Morocco experiences, and a more liberal take on the world- something rather rare at GWA. Unfortunately, Katie tried and tried, and was unable to reach Janette.

I visited the Kindlings Muse again today, to listen to Dick Staub be interviewed actually, about his new book, The Culturally Savvy Christian. (If you'll recall, he gives podcasts from a liberal Christian perspective, in the tradition of Jim Wallis, John Perkins, and Tony Campolo.) It sounds like a great book, encouraging us to go beyond the shallow sub-culture American Evangelicals have created, and really try to live the Kingdom. I got a chance to ask him about the role that martyrdom and persecution play in radical Christianity, and you can hear his answer here, at the beginning of the 3rd installment of the podcast. The typical way this happens is the interviewer wanders through the audience with a mike, asking audience members to state their name and then read their pre-written question.

After the final segment, a woman came up to our table. She asked to confirm that my name was Jedidiah, and that I'd lived in Morocco. After receiving dual affirmations, she announced that she was indeed Janette, whom I'd met for five minutes! Unable to reach her in any other manner, I suddenly found her at a table in a bar listening to pontifications on progressive Christianity.

This proves two things. My name is astonishingly rare. And it really is a small world of liberal committed Christians here in Seattle.

9 comments:

drh said...

Did you offer to purchase a beverage for her?

Mary said...

glad to see you're still an active blogger old friend despite your need to move so much, even in the Web World. Glad to know you're still you. Hey, you're going to be a one-year-old American resident. Take care old friend... mary

@bdul muHib said...

Don't remind me :-(

Good to hear from you, Mary! Long time since seeing your comments- always appreciated.

I blog less nowadays, as my month tallies show on the side. Less cool stuff happening on a regular basis, and less travel.

drh said...

You know, becoming boring doesn't bode well for your new foray into the dating scene...

quaintance said...

Cool, running into someone you have connections with by chance. The world is inded small!

I hope youare well. I agree with drh above. How's the salsa going, tell us about adventures you've had in Seattle...

Of course, my very exciting weekend consists mainly of grading a bunch of papers and figuring out something to do with my mom that, well, let's me get papers done.

@bdul muHib said...

Not too many new adventures in Seattle. Salsa I'm ending this Teusday- it's just not as fun without friends to do it with, and you're not coming up here for the Folk Festival to dance with :-)

quaintance said...

Sorry to hear you are quitting dancing; it's sometimes hard to make friends within dance community, I've found. Maybe I'll be able to make the festival next year. I'll start a savings account for it now. If I spend the money, I'll no choice but to work it in wit hteh crazy end-of-year schedule. Plus, I don't have any family graduating next year, as is happening here that weekend.

I'm exhausted. I've spent all day cleaning my classroom. In 20 minutes I leave and reward myself with some sketching in a public garden.

@bdul muHib said...

Well, you know, everything I dance, I dance for you. ;-)

quaintance said...

I say, you can dance if you want to. You can leave your friends behind, because your friends don't dance. And, if they don't dance, well, they're no friends of mine.

(Actually, the photos above remind me of the video of that song. Everyone looks ready to jump up and join in.)